10 Reasons to Blog in Student Affairs

July 26, 2011

No matter if you are an administrator or student leader, your department or organization should have a blog. Listed below are 10 reasons your student affairs organization should have a blog.

1. Connection: Blogs extend your reach. Students are attracted to the way blogs disseminate information. They can quickly scan and get the information they need. Students can also “Like” or “Tweet” information, pictures, videos, or web links posted to your blog to all the people they are connected with. This sharing of your groups information really helps to extend your mission to a larger audience. Don’t forget PARENTS! Your parents will also find your organizational blog a beneficial way to stay connected.

2. Current Information: By blogging you are getting your students the most current information instantly.  There is plenty of information you need to get your students quickly that could be educational, informative, imperative, or just plain fun.

Flood or loss of power? Post procedures and links to campus and town safety resources. Program this week? Post details to publicize and generate excitement. Afterwards, summarize the program and allow for extended learning and discussion. Your Greek Organization is volunteering? Post your blog reminders and updates. Take video or pictures during the event and post on your blog after the event.

3. Support:  Through your blog your students will have access to helpful information 24/7.  One part of your blog is the blog itself. There is also a “website” portion where you can add pages just like you would to a traditional website. Your pages contain your permanent information such as links to campus website, off-campus resources, student code of conduct, check in/out procedures, how to’s, do’s and don’ts, staff pictures and bios, and much more. Standard information that students need access to can be posted to the mainly static pages and the new, timely information will post to your blog on a regular basis. Blogs also allow for comments. This is another way that a student can approach your organization for assistance.  Just be certain to return comments in a timely manner.

4. Engagement: Blogs are interactive and engaging to your students!  Your blog can be full of pictures, videos, polls, comments, twitter feed, web links, and posting buttons for other types of social media (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn).

5. Exchange: Blogs are very useful in soliciting feedback. Blog comments and polls are very valuable in extending conversation between staff and students, students and students, or your organization and its broader world audience.

Of course kudos and positive comments are always welcome. The challenging and most beneficial comments can be those that are contrary, critical, or unfounded. If you take things too personally you might consider these to be “bad” comments.  But there are no bad comments, just good conversation.  Often a “bad” comment can come from a student that has a need or may feel slighted in some way. The way a blogger replies to comments can help shape opinions, educate, and diffuse situations.  Opportunities can spawn from blog comments like connections made, problems solved, face-to-face interactions created, and educational moments.

6. Scheduling: A blog that is updated with events, calendars, agendas, contests, and promotions will keep your students informed of what is going on in your residence hall, department, club or organization.

7. Predictability: When you update your blog daily, weekly, or on a routine basis, your students will know how and when to expect information.

8. Human Touch: Your blog will bring a personal nature to your technological web presence. Blogs are conversational and less formal in how information is presented. There can be a sense of fun with a blog, and it provides a “human touch” to an increasingly technologically-oriented student.

9. Assessment: Your organizational blog is an informal tool to assess what your students are learning, what goals are being met, and what changes you need to make. You can use comments and quick polls to gauge what students are learning from programs or other educational initiatives. If you use a free WordPress blog format such as this one, (StudentLifeGuru.com) you can track the effectiveness of your blog through statistics, track backs, and search terms.

10. Eco-Friendly:  Yes, it is time to kiss that monthly paper newsletter good-bye! Go green! Save some trees and start a blog for your organization.


Are you already blogging for your organization? What suggestions would you add to this top ten list to encourage others to begin a blog for their area? Have you received similar results from your blogging experiences?


Student Affairs & Graduate School: A Brief “How-To”

October 26, 2010

I remember the day I decided to pursue a career in student affairs as if it was yesterday. I was sitting in my apartment and texting back and forth with my supervisor. He said he was going to Penn State University in the coming days to register for dissertation classes and to speak with his advisor. He asked if I wanted to go and talk with the chair of the master’s program to see if this would be a career I would be interested in.

Prior to this conversation, I had my life planned out. I was going to teach, become a principal, earn a doctorate, and become a superintendent.

I thought about my experiences as a RA, student government member, and Student Trustee. I really enjoyed my experience at Bloomsburg University, but was this something I wanted to make into a career?

After speaking with the program chair and a bit more with my supervisor, I decided to apply to graduate school. After a two-month rat race of researching schools, registering for the GRE and speaking with advisors and professors, I submitted application materials to schools. After several interviews and campus visits, I accepted an offer from Bowling Green State University. There I would have a two-year assistantship as a Graduate Hall Director in the Office of Residence Life.

As I think back to my journey from undergrad to graduate school, I want to offer advice for those considering going to grad school for a master’s in student affairs.

  • Know thyself – I took a chance on a new career path and it has been rewarding. However, graduate school and student affairs are not for everyone. Graduate school should not be an avenue to delay “the real world” (for those going from undergrad straight to grad school). Likewise, viewing student affairs as an extension of undergrad or to “relive the best days” are two poisonous thoughts. Going into student affairs is a commitment to helping college students develop the necessary skills to be successful and mature adults.
  • Start early – My journey was unique. I did not make a decision until the end of September that graduate school was my next step. As a result, I rushed through certain steps and did not get the recommended preparation time for the GRE. Give yourself enough time to make correct decisions on how many and which schools to submit applications, who to ask for recommendations, drafting application essays, and proper preparation for the GRE.
  • Be prepared to get and give rejection – One of the key words you will hear on your search is “fit.” Just as schools are considering you, you have to consider the institution, program, and location. I interviewed with several schools (who accepted me into their program), but I felt it was not the best “fit” for me. Likewise, I was rejected from many programs where I thought I had a good “fit.” I learned to be honest with each school through the process. If you feel it is not a good fit, be open and honest with the department/program chair.
  • Patience – Everyone works with deadlines. Every school has a different deadline date, review date, and interview date(s). Being patient and trusting the process is all part of the application process.
  • M.A., M.S., or M.Ed.? The difference between the types of degrees depends on whom you ask. Traditionally, the M.A. is viewed as a generalist degree; having transferrable skills and prepares one for a variety of jobs. The M.S. is viewed as a degree with one specific focus such as microbiology or organic chemistry. The M.Ed. is rooted in educational disciplines such as guidance counseling, curriculum & instruction, or instructional technology. Whatever the type of degree it is, it will vary institution to institution, and in most instances, you will find answers in the program curriculum guide.
  • Type of Program – When researching student affairs graduate programs you will come across a variety of program names. Some of the more common program names include College Student Personnel (CSP), Higher Education and Student Affairs (HESA), Educational Leadership with a focus in Higher Education, and Higher Education Administration (HEA). While these names sound similar, their functions can be different. Some programs are student development focused while others are geared towards the administration within student affairs and/or higher education in general.

Below are two excellent web resources you can use when considering graduate schools for student affairs:

American College Personnel Association’s Directory of Graduate Programs

National Association of Student Personnel Administrator’s Graduate Program Directory

Steve Knepp (@stevenknepp) is currently finishing his first year as a full-time professional in higher education. His areas of interest include residence life, student government, and student leadership development. Steve earned his B.S. in Elementary Education from Bloomsburg University and his M.A. in College Student Personnel from Bowling Green State University. His hobbies include camping, golf, and traveling. You can follow Steve on his blog at http://steve0709.wordpress.com


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