Overcoming Mobbing: A Recovery Guide for Workplace Aggression and Bullying (Book Review)


Overcoming Mobbing

It is my contention that the workplace should be a place of collegiality, integrity, and respect. Unfortunately, as long as there are differences in agendas, opinions, personalities, and power there will always be conflicts at work. Some of these conflicts can become downright nasty and end up costing individuals their jobs, and more insidious, their health, well-being, and subsequently, the welfare of their families.

I came across a great resource when doing some research on workplace bullying that I thought would be helpful for Student Affairs professionals. Overcoming Mobbing: A Recovery Guide for Workplace Aggression and Bullying (2014: Oxford University Press) by Maureen Duffy and Len Sperry is a must read for those professionals dealing with or attempting to prevent organizational bullying. Duffy and Sperry define “mobbing” as “a destructive social process in which individuals, groups, or organizations target a person for ridicule, humiliation, and removal from the workplace.” Mobbing is different than bullying in that it occurs en mass involving multiple workers, administrators, and managers willing to participate in unethical communication that is both written and verbal. Bullying, on the other hand, occurs when one individual, such as a supervisor alone, targets an employee.

The process of ganging up includes such behaviors as the following: workplace conflict, people taking sides, unethical communication, other aggressive and abusive acts, involvement of management or administration, elimination of the target from the workplace, and post-elimination unethical communication. Mobbing is caused by a mix of individual, group, and organizational dynamics. An example of mobbing in Student Affairs can include colleagues ganging up on someone who is in line for promotion to a senior position in their department because those individuals do not want that person to assume that role. Tactics they use include spreading false information about their performance, befriending executive decision-makers and giving inaccurate and negative reports of that person, and purposely not inviting them to informal department meetings outside of normal work hours. As a result, they do not receive the promotion, begin to come under undue scrutiny from supervisors, and ultimately leave the institution because of the abuse.

Given the highly bureaucratic and politically-charged nature of higher education institutions, it only stands to reason that mobbing can and does occur within colleges and universities. Overcoming Mobbing: A Recovery Guide for Workplace Aggression and Bullying is a great primer that administrators in Student Affairs departments can use to facilitate discussion on how to create and nurture a “mobbing-free” environment. While it is unreasonable to think that colleges and universities are the bastions of collegiality and civility, we as Student Affairs administrators should ultimately work toward that goal, particularly as we serve as role models to our students.

What are some strategies that you feel should be used in order to create a “mobbing-free” workplace in Student Affairs?

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2 Responses to Overcoming Mobbing: A Recovery Guide for Workplace Aggression and Bullying (Book Review)

  1. Donna M. Schaeffer, M.A. says:

    Excellent post and your timing is perfect. We have entered the point in the academic year where “mobbing” will reach its peak, given employee turnover, transition and promotion. The sad reality is that “mobbing” is more prevalent than we think, and for being a part of a profession that prides itself on embracing diversity in all its forms, sometimes we are its biggest opponents, rather than proponents. Each day we are bombarded by the “me and so and so” mentality, and find ourselves easily caught up in the selfishness. We forget our responsibility to be the role models of integrity, inclusiveness, practicality, support and protectors of the common good; role models not just for the students and parents we serve, but role models for our peers and supervisors.

    • Thanks so much for your thoughts! I wholeheartedly agree. We should be “protectors of the common good” and thereby practice what we preach. It’s one thing to mentor students toward civility, but quite another to actually practice that with our own professional colleagues.

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