The Role of Housing & Residence Life on Student Success (***Free Activity Sheet***)

April 27, 2016

Beads

I have developed an activity for resident assistants that can be used during annual training or as a session for staff development throughout the academic year. A university requested that I give a presentation on “What role does on campus housing have in the overall collegiate experience and student success?” Rather than doing the typical PowerPoint presentation and frequently cite research from Pascarella and Terenzini’s How College Affects Students, I thought I’d create a more active and creative experience. Click here to get a free PDF activity sheet that you can print and use with your own staff.

Not only do the student participants get to understand important outcomes associated with living on campus, but they get to reflect on their own personal residence life experience, and actually get to walk away with a personally-significant souvenir. Participants are given a pack of beads and a plastic bracelet strand with a knot tied in the end. You can obtain bags of these beads at a craft store, such as Michaels and Jo-Ann Fabric and Craft Stores. The activity leader reads each outcome and the participants put that bead on their bracelet strand if it pertains to them. If not, they simply leave the bead in their pack. Everyone’s experience is different, so it’s perfectly fine if they have different looking strands of beads!

Outcomes include the following:

  1. Orange = Held a leadership position in the halls
  2. Yellow = Participate in at least one extracurricular activity on campus
  3. Red = Resolved a conflict or argument with a roommates
  4. Lavender = Have a friend or have a hall mate who is GLBTQ
  5. Dark Blue = Participated in an living-learning community activity or program
  6. Pink = Feel you have made good decisions for yourself
  7. White =You are satisfied with being at your university
  8. Light Blue = Have met your significant other
  9. Cream = You have decided to go to graduate school
  10. Black = You feel that you are an independent person
  11. Clear Light Blue = You have decided on a profession
  12. Clear Dark Blue = You have a friend or hall mate who is of another culture or nation
  13. Clear Yellow = You enjoy your college experience
  14. Clear Red = Your political views have changed since high school
  15. Clear Pink = Your religious views have changed since high school
  16. Clear Green = You feel confident about your academic abilities
  17. Clear Orange = You feel self-confident about yourself
  18. Clear = You feel like you have personally grown while living in the halls
  19. Green = You have made close friends
  20. Animal (or other special bead different from the others) = You will be graduating this year

The following questions can be used to engage discussion related to the outcomes:

  • Which of these outcomes stood out the most for you personally?
  • How have you felt you contributed to one of these outcomes for a resident you oversee?
  • What can the residence life program do to foster more of these outcomes for residents?
  • How has this activity motivated you to any new action or attitude?

Additionally, the participants can continue to customize their bead strands into a bracelet or keychain with supplies you provide. This can include lettered beads into which they can incorporate their names. This is a great way for your staff to learn about the important role of living on campus while also giving them time to bond, share their own experiences with each other, and be creative.

Click HERE to receive a free PDF copy of the activity sheet that you can use and share.

Please comment below if you use this activity and let us know how it went!


Difficult Discussions: Coaching an Employee Out of the Job (*Guest Post in The Student Affairs Collective*)

March 31, 2016

Difficult Employee Conversations

One challenge of being a supervisor is having to discuss performance shortcomings with employees. In some cases, you may need to coach someone out of the job. This month I wrote about the topic as a guest blogger on The Student Affairs Collective blog. To see the post in full, please click on Difficult Discussions: Coaching and Employee Out of the Job.

Special thanks to Tom Krieglstein and his team for the opportunity to discuss this issue!


Turn the Tide: Rise above Toxic, Difficult Situations in the Workplace (*Book Review*)

February 9, 2016

Turn the Tide by Dr. Kathy Obear

Dr. Kathy Obear recently published Turn the Tide: Rise Above Toxic, Difficult Situations in the Workplace, which is a resource that you can use yourself or with your staff and / or students. The book is available as a $2.99 Kindle download on Amazon.

While Dr. Obear explicitly states in the text that she herself is not a therapist, the book is essentially an illustration of rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT). “REBT’s basic hypothesis is that our emotions stem mainly from our beliefs, which influence the evaluations and interpretations we make of the reactions we have to life situations” (Corey, 2013, p. 268). Through the REBT process, individuals can replace ineffective ways of thinking and thereby change their emotional reactions to various situations they encounter in their life. Likewise, Dr. Obear walks the reader through a similar process in which individuals, particularly those who are having challenging times in the workplace, can shift their thoughts and reactions to more positive and proactive outcomes.

The book is organized into ten chapters: 1.) I can’t control how I react! Maybe I can; 2.) Step 1 – What pushed my buttons; 3.) Step 2 – Intrapersonal Roots; 4.) Step 3 – Making meaning: Change your story, change your reactions; 5.) Step 4 – Common physiological, emotional, and mental reactions; 6.) Step 5 – “Choosing” your intentions; 7.) Step 6 – Tools to Respond Effectively; 8.) Step 7 – The impact of our triggered reactions; 9.) Maximize our effectiveness: Focus on Self-Care and Healing Practices; and 10.) We Always Have a Choice. The book has many self-directed exercises in them, which helps the reader to explore and work through the various feelings and thoughts they may be having as a result of being in a challenging work environment. While the content of the book centers on one’s own personal reactions to the day-to-day dynamics of working with others, it does not cover the more nefarious and even illegal issues that can and do occur in the workplace, such as bullying, discrimination, harassment, and how to manage those particular situations.

I highly recommend Turn the Tide: Rise Above Toxic, Difficult Situations in the Workplace for graduate students, new professionals, and those supervisors who are responsible for developing staff training and professional development opportunities. 

Works cited:

Corey, G. (2013). Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy. Stamford, CT: Brooks / Cole.


Relocation 501: Five Things to Consider Financially When Job Searching Nationally

January 28, 2016

Student Affairs Job Relocation

In our previous post, “Relocation 101: Three Things to Consider When Job Searching Nationally,” Adrienne Boertjen covered some of the essentials to think about when expanding your job search outside of your current region. This was written particularly with graduate students and new professionals in mind. For this current post, I will cover financial considerations and logistics for those more seasoned professionals, especially those looking to relocate with partners, children, and / or other family members.

1. COST OF LIVING: I use Sperling’s Best Places Cost of Living Comparison to enter in my current salary and town in which I live in order to get an estimated comparable salary and find the related costs associated with living in the city in which I am interested in working. If you are looking at a potential promotion to a mid-level or senior level position in the field, not only should you expect an increase to what you are currently earning, but the pay should align with the cost of living in that particular area. Don’t dupe yourself into a situation in which you are asked for your current salary numbers and the offering institution offers a modest increase to that number. You need to be able to make a living and thrive in the the new community so don’t sell yourself short. There are wide fluctuations in the price of housing in various markets all over the United States so be prepared.

2. SALARIES: Do your homework on what the average salary is for the position you are being offered and factor in the cost of living difference. HigherEdJobs.com has a nice listing of various salary surveys that you can view. If you are looking at a state school, salaries may be publicly posted online so you can get an idea of what current administrators are making there along with other public officials. Some regional newspapers and “watchdog” groups also publish public salaries, which you can search for online (e.g., PennWatch is one example for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania). In the case of institutions that have collective bargaining units (i.e., unions), you may be able to find a copy of the associated contract for the type of position you are applying. In the contract, they typically list out the schedule of salaries for various levels of position and seniority. An example for one of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education bargaining units can be seen HERE. Also, many job descriptions, particularly on the institution’s human resources webpage, will include a position salary level signified by a payroll code. If you dig deeper through their HR site, you may be able to find a chart or listing of those payroll codes and the corresponding salary ranges. Keep in mind that not all have this however.

One time with my own job search, I found the organizational chart of the public institution for where I was interviewing. With the names of the search committee members in hand along with the key administrators in the division, I was able to search their salaries online very easily. Seeing that the supervisor of the position I was interviewing for was earning roughly what I would negotiate for, I knew that it would be highly unlikely that I would be offered nearly what I thought would be fair with my credentials and experience. Given the highly expensive cost of living with the location of the institution, I knew it wouldn’t be financially viable for me if offered the position so I didn’t get my heart set on it.

You have to be able to weigh all of the intrinsic and extrinsic benefits associated with working at a particular institution in a specific part of the country. Obviously, salary isn’t everything, but you need to be able to pay your bills.  If it doesn’t make sense, walk away from it.

3. LIVING IN VS. LIVING OUT: There are many special considerations when you are a Residence Life staff member in regards to living in vs. living out. This can also include non-ResLife administrators in other roles that require you to live in or simply give you the option to do so. As any ResLifer will tell you, there are both many benefits and drawbacks to living on campus.

  • Housing Expenses: If you are currently living in and looking to change to a “live out” position, you need to look at your current financial situation and how that will change by what is being offered with a new position. Earning $35,000 as a live-in hall director in the rural Midwest will most definitely be worth “more” financially than a $50,000 live-out assistant director position in New York City. Living out means that you will need to rent or mortgage housing along with all associated costs, including, but not limited to, utilities and transportation. So don’t jump at something simply because it’s a position promotion. You do not want to move and then be unable to afford your living situation and then have to job search all over again or acquire debt that you do not necessarily need.
  • On-Campus Culture: If you are currently living out and now considering a position that is live-in, you need to understand that there is a distinct culture with living among and near college students. I myself and my family have had (and continue to have) positive experiences with living in. The conveniences with living in a university community are numerous. With easy access to educational, cultural, and recreational opportunities, it’s pretty awesome! Also, not having to pay rent or utilities is definitely the biggest plus (if, of course, that is a part of your compensation package). Additionally, I don’t have to worry about lawn care, and all of the other expenses and hassles that come with having your own home. I was a previous home owner prior to moving back in so I know. However, living in is not for everyone, nor for others’ partners or their children. There isn’t the level of privacy and anonymity that you would get with living out so that’s something you need to keep in mind. For me the benefits outweigh the drawbacks, but this is something you will need to consider if faced with this option.
  • Family & Partner Policies: Those who are not married, but with a partner, may need to take dig deeper to find the institution’s policy on this type of arrangement for living on their campus. The same goes for married couples and children as well. What one institution finds copacetic may not necessary be permitted at another college or university. Find this out ahead of time well before considering a move because you definitely do not want to be surprised when you show up with a packed moving van. I have a close friend and colleague who shared with me that he had a phone interview with an institution and started talking about his fiancee (now wife). The committee chairperson made the remark that they did not permit live-in professionals to have other occupants living with them, including spouses. At that point my colleague respectfully ended the conversation because their non-cohabitation policy was simply a “deal breaker.”
  • Apartments.com & Realtor.com: I use these apps on my phone to quickly look up the general price of housing for the needs of my family related to institutions I may be interested in applying to. I can quickly rule out some potential opportunities simply by seeing how much it costs to live in a particular area. This can save a lot of time and heartache for both myself and my family because the job searching process can be both time-consuming and anxiety provoking. Why look at something that simply is not going to be realistically affordable?

4. RELOCATION EXPENSES & TEMPORARY HOUSING: Some institutions will reimburse you for relocation costs while others will not. Typically you won’t see this for entry-level positions, but it never hurts to ask. Picking up yourself and potentially your entire family is very stressful and can be an expense you normally don’t consider when job searching. If possible, see if the hiring institution can provide temporary housing for you on campus while you work out the logistics of getting settled into your permanent housing situation. This can be an easy sell because it will help you to better focus on the job during the work week while you can spend the weekend searching for various options. I myself asked for that when moving across Pennsylvania to a new institution. I had to sell my house while my wife and kids lived temporarily with my in-law’s. The university graciously permitted me to live in a residence hall room at no charge for the summer until I could get things squared away for permanent housing.

5. SCOUTING THE AREA: It is imperative that you take time to scout the area of the institution in which you are looking to relocate. This can be done before, during, and after the on-campus interview process. My recommendation is to always steer clear of an institution that offers the job without actually bringing you to campus. Even if you are familiar with or visited the campus previously, or even attended there as a student, being offered a job only after having a phone or Skype-type interview is clearly a red flag! Not only won’t you get to meet your peers, staff, and students in person, but you will not get a chance to explore the campus and local community.

  • Rental Vehicle: Typically I will rent a car after flying in when I am offered an on-campus interview. This allows me to cruise around the area and explore the community in which the university is located. You can come a day early or stay a day later if you need extra time to accomplish this. Sometimes the college or university will accommodate your request for the extra day. When exploring, I am particularly interested in looking at housing, shopping options, entertainment and recreation venues, and the general locations of schools for my kids. I want to know what the basics of day-to-day life would be like living in that community: Where would we go grocery shopping? Are there things for my kids to do? Would I have to pay a bunch of tolls to get around? What is traffic like? What would my commute be like? Do I think my wife would like it here? How much of a hassle would it be for family to visit if traveling from the airport?
  • Google Maps / Street View: If you cannot explore the area, you can also use the Google Maps Street View option to see what many areas look like. Not all towns and streets are always covered, but you can get a pretty decent idea of what the surrounding area of a college or university looks like. I do this ahead of time to get a lay of the land and to potentially figure out something to do in the evening(s) with the free time I would have during a multi-day interview process (e.g., movie theater, brew pub, bookstore, sporting event, concert, etc.)

 What are some other strategies and tips that you have used when job searching nationally? Please share your comments below or simply retweet this post and add your thoughts to the tweet.


Relocation 101: Three Things to Consider When Job Searching Nationally (Guest post by Adrienne Boertjens)

January 5, 2016

Student Affairs Job Relocation

Job search season is right around the corner, and as colleges and universities across the country prepare their search teams for trips to the various student affairs job placement events, the time has come for aspiring graduate students, new professionals and some seasoned professionals alike to face the inevitable question: “Where do I go from here?”

When it comes to job searching in Student Affairs, career progression is the obvious primary consideration. As a field, we also talk a lot about “Institutional Fit” and how to identify an employer that aligns with your professional values, desired culture, and educational philosophy. All of these are incredibly valuable factors in the job search process, however even if you find your “dream institution” it’s important to consider geographical fit, and how adjusting to life in a different regional culture may impact your overall transition. What kind of move will both challenge and support you in your professional growth? To get started, here are a few things to consider when determining your geographical fit:

1. Consider the basics, but don’t stop there!

  • Geography: Everyone has their geographic deal-breakers, and while it’s best to minimize them when it comes to these basic considerations for job searching, some things just can’t be avoided. For some people, certain geographic regions simply don’t agree with their lifestyle, whether it’s because they can’t stand the heat of the Deep South, or because shoveling snow off their car at 7am just doesn’t sound like a good time. Either way, knowing the extremes of what you’re willing to handle is a good place to start, but shouldn’t be the end-all, be-all of your search.
  • Personal support system: When it comes to a dual-job search or considering the needs of your dependents, there are a ton of factors to consider. If you’re moving on your own or if your job is the main factor in a move, as is the case for many new grads and new professionals, it’s helpful to identify just how far you’re willing to move away from your loved ones. Thanks to technology, staying in touch with your personal support system is easier than ever, however when you live far away from the people you care about, you have to consider how far and how often you’re willing to travel to be with them. Are you willing to miss out on a holiday or two for the sake of landing your “perfect fit?” Are you prepared to shell out for a plane ticket should a family emergency arise? While we can always hope for the best when it comes to these situations, it’s good to know literally how far you’ll go for your dream job.
  • Pro-tip for aspiring graduate students: These basic considerations may be better off on the back-burner when you’re searching for graduate assistantships and choosing your graduate program. While it can be tempting to continue your studies at your undergraduate alma mater or to stay close to home, graduate school is a wonderful opportunity to step outside of your geographic comfort zone. Your graduate program is probably only 2-3 years long, and it will be over before you know it! Take advantage of this short amount of time and consider moving somewhere you normally wouldn’t live long-term. Your resume and your professional network will thank you!

2. Consider your professional networking goals. For new grads and professionals especially, growing and developing your professional network in the field of Student Affairs is a must. Now is the time to establish a strong and positive professional reputation, which can present a challenge if you’re not willing to leave the comfort of your alma mater or home state. As a Student Affairs practitioner, growing and maintaining a strong network will contribute to your own professional development and can even assist you in future job searches. On the flipside, maybe you’ve already spent some time away from your Student Affairs family or a special mentor, and you’d appreciate being within regional conferencing proximity to them. When starting a new job, having an existing professional network close by may provide a certain level of comfort and support that can make your transition easier. If maintaining close ties with your existing professional network is important to you when it comes to relocation, consider moving to a region where you’ll strike a balance between having lots of new networking opportunities, and where you’ll still feel the support of your existing professional relationships. There’s nothing like a good ol’ regional conference reunion!

3. Consider state/regional professional development/involvement opportunities. Each department in each institution is going to have a different opinion or level of financial support for their professionals’ development opportunities. Regardless of whether or not your department has the financial means to send you to a national conference each year, it’s important that you’re able to seek out your own professional development opportunities in order to continue to grow in the field. As such, consider researching state/regional professional organizations or chapters of national organizations as a way of determining whether or not there will be opportunities for you to join committees, attend conferences, network, and take charge of your own professional development outside of your place of employment.

While this list is certainly not the end-all, be-all of relocating, these are some important things to think about as you begin applying to jobs and considering where you may want to spend the next phase of your career. What are some other things that you’ve considered when making a decision to relocate? Please share your thoughts in the comments below, or tweet me at @aboertjens.

Adrienne Boertjens is a Residence Director at Plymouth State University in New Hampshire, and a proud alumnae of Eastern Michigan University (2015, M.A.) and Minnesota State University, Mankato (2013, B.A.). She is passionate about travel, arts and crafts and all things technology! Connect with Adrienne via email, Twitter, LinkedIn.


Staff Development Delegation Activity Kit

September 30, 2015

image

Student Life Consultants is pleased to announce a new staff development activity kit that is now available for purchase. The delegation activity kit comes complete with enough materials to facilitate a delegation exercise for 50 – 75 individuals. This is an excellent leadership activity to have for training staff and / or organization members on how to follow directions, delegate projects, or explain tasks in a more effective manner. The activity allows your participants to take turns delegating instructions to one another in attempt to successfully construct a pattern illustrated on the activity cards with a time limit and without actually showing the card to their partner. Additionally, the partner giving the instructions should not see the progress of their partner until after time is called.  With six different patterns, each partner would be able to made three patterns each – one describing the pattern while the other builds it. One variation of the activity includes having a third partner in each group to simply observe and share observations during discussion afterward.

While you may think that this is simple enough, and all of the groups would get the pattern completed correctly every time, inevitably, the activity demonstrates confusion, frustration, and a lack of shared understanding among various groups. Of course, some sets of partners get it perfect. This dynamic allows the training facilitator to discuss effective communication. Partners who easily made the shapes can share strategies that allowed them to complete the task. Additionally, those who did not can share what was confusing and how they changed tactics in order to become more successful. The training facilitator can continue the conversation by discussing communication strategies specific to their particular organization.

Kit benefits and features include:

  • “Ready-made” activity with all of the necessary materials for 50 – 75 participants
  • A laminated “Delegation Tips for Effective Leaders” sheet that can be photocopied and shared
  • Activity variant suggestions so you can customize to suit the needs of your group
  • Individual resealable bags for each group of cubes, card sets, and the overall kit for easy clean up and storage

The kit comes complete with all materials to manage the actual delegation activity, including six packs of block pattern cards (i.e. 25 cards in each pack), and 25 packs of plastic cubes, which the groups will use to build the shapes illustrated on the activity cards. The kit is $24.99 plus shipping & handling. You can purchase the kit by clicking HERE to go to our online store. We can also provide an invoice and / or purchase order for those organizations who have various purchasing policies requiring it or do not permit you to purchase online with a credit card. Simply write to us at orders@studentlifeconsultants.com to help you. Please ask us about bulk rates as well.  

Delegation Activity Kit

Please note: the kit comes with more materials than pictured and includes a plastic storage bag; the photo is for display purposes only.


8 Mistakes to Avoid During the Housing & Residence Life Move-In Process

September 9, 2015

Residence Life Mistakes

August has come and gone with an incredible amount of hard work from my staff for which I am extremely grateful. This has inspired me to think of some of the lessons that I have learned (the hard way!) over the past 20+ years of being a part of and managing the move-in process for new and returning students. While this isn’t an exhaustive list, I feel the following are eight of the most important Mistakes to Avoid During the Housing & Residence Life Move-In Process:

    1. DON’T FEED YOUR STAFF – Move-in is a very busy and stressful time. Unfortunately, we can forget about doing the simple things we need to do like eating (remember Maslow?) If you are going to require your staff to be there all day for move-in, you need to feed them. Or at the very least give them ample time to go and take care of themselves. Rotate shifts with your staff if need be. Keep in mind that orientation-type meals may have long lines and may not be the best option for staff who need to be in and out quickly. For move-in days here in which I need my entire staff working, I will either have food delivered or shop for groceries (i.e., sandwich fixings, fried chicken, salad ingredients, etc.) so that they can make they own plate and spend some time relaxing with one another. Remember to consider those with food allergies and / or other nutritional considerations (i.e., vegetarian, religious, diet / wellness, etc.) because pizza, wings, burgers, and hot dogs are easy and convenient, but not always universally appreciated.
    2. ARGUING WITH PARENTS – While you may be right with your argument and holding your ground, this is one fight that you are not going to win in the end. Parents are very quick to email and / or call the VP and / or the president of the institution, and students are eager to complain on social media. In many cases, some people just cannot be appeased so you’re better off having handled a situation in a respectful and “win-win” manner rather than adding fuel to the fire. I also recommend reading Eight Strategies for Communicating with Challenging Parents I wrote for The Student Affairs Collective.
    3. HAVING STUDENT STAFF MANAGE IRATE PARENTS – Handling irate parents is never fun nor is it something we look forward to. However, doing so should always be managed by a full-time professional staffer and not a student resident assistant. That’s why we’re paid professionals. Professional staffers also have more leeway when it comes to making decisions and coming up which options (or holding the line) that student staffers cannot. Furthermore, this can be an emotionally traumatic experience for a student employee, which will inevitably set a negative tone with them for the rest of the year.
    4. NOT PREPARING FOR CONTINGENCIES – Not to sound like a post-apocalyptic “prepper,” but problems will happen so you need to prepare for the worst. Know your placements, know your vacancies, and know how to make switches if needed. Not only can unexpected maintenance issues arise, but simple occupancy mistakes can also necessitate moving students (i.e., mixing genders in a single gender room / floor by accident). Do you have cleaning staff on site? What do you do if a key does not work? Is there a plan if the fire alarm goes off? Granted, you can’t think of every little scenario that could happen, but remember problems that have occurred in the past, and create a plan to handles those types of situations. Your staff will also appreciate this rather than having to scramble to find answers.
    5. NOT DRESSING COMFORTABLY – August is always hot no matter where you are in the country. A dress code is important, but you need to consider what is appropriate during a warm move-in. We are usually equipped with a new department t-shirt or polo, which is usually comfortable enough. But if these aren’t provided, consider relaxing the dress code to accommodate your staffers who will inevitably be moving carts, running errands, and walking the floors to meet and greet parents and students.
    6. MAKING PROMISES YOU CANNOT KEEP – We all want to be helpful and provide a memorable move-in experience for our students and their families. However, as I always tell my staff, if you don’t know something, ask! Don’t make it up just to get rid of someone or make yourself look like a hero! Never promise something that you cannot deliver on. Not only does this make the team look bad, but also the institution as a whole. Plus it can start a rocky relationship from day one, which will inevitably resurface again and again throughout the year. As an example, if there is a cleaning complaint and you say someone will be there within the hour to touch it up, someone BETTER be there within the hour. Likewise, if you state that a new mattress can be supplied within the week, you BETTER have a new mattress there within seven days. Not only does this apply to facilities issues, but even relationship building and student development practices (e.g., “I can help you find clubs to get involved with!”; “Come to dinner with us tonight…I’ll be by at 5pm to get you!”)
    7. LOSING YOUR COOL – August can be the most stressful time of the year for most of us. Case in point, when August 1st rolls around I always tell my wife, “I’ll see you in September!” (Residence Life spouses are saints by the way!) Managing training, resources, facilities, and the anticipation of increasing nasty parental involvement and student complaints is enough to create more than a few sleepless nights for Residence Life professionals. However, you need to be able to successfully manage that stress and not lose your cool during the move-in process. As the leader, you must be the role model as the cool and collected professional in charge. Granted, this is not easy; I myself have become angry in years past and wish I could have a few “re-do’s” with a few situations. But as a result I have become more self-aware after having more practice under stressful circumstances. Losing your cool in front of fellow colleagues, staff, students, and / or parents is certainly embarrassing, and can even cost you your job. Sometimes you simply need a few minutes to yourself to breathe and clear your head. It’s alright to ask for help and delegate authority to another colleague so you can take a break for a few moments. I often hear Student Affairs professionals talk about self-care, but rarely practice it. ResLifers particularly wear a “badge of courage” when it comes to managing work and trading war stories. Unfortunately, this doesn’t bode well for business as we can constantly be on edge and are more prone to lose our cool.
    8. NOT THANKING YOUR STAFF – I have heard various managers use the phrase, “Hard work in itself should be thanks enough!” which I think is simply arrogant. People appreciate being acknowledged for working hard. I strongly believe that I am nothing without the dedication and support of my employees. As a servant leader, I do my best to thank my staff not only at the end of the move-in process, but every morning and throughout the day as well. I try to see various “above-and-beyond” moments that staffers provide and point them out to them expressing my gratitude. And to be honest, making them feel good also makes me feel good! That’s something we all can benefit from holistically.

What are some other mistakes to avoid during the move-in process? Please share below in the comment section or tweet me at @studentlifeguru.


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